American Flyer Displays & History

Return to Promotional Layouts & Displays
Roar of the Rails Boys' Railroad Club Rotating Layouts
Complete Railroad System 1956 Catalog Cover Layout New York World's Fair - 1939
Shelburne Museum Eastern States Exposition Freedomland, U.S.A.
Advertising Transparencies Other Promotional Displays  

Advertising Transparencies Click on the photos for a larger view & more information

Washington on High Trestle + Rocket Sled Washington on Low Trestle + Rocket Sled
Pikemaster Rolling Stock Pikemaster Yard Scene
Frontiersman & Missouri Pacific Alco Boy & Washington
Frontiersman on Floor Cereal Box Ad
Small Child & HO Layout Assorted HO Rolling Stock
Boy & HO Trains Boy & HO 0-6-0 Switcher
Boy Working on HO Trains HO 0-6-0 Switcher Set
HO Frontiersman Set
HO Frontiersman Set
HO Industrial Switcher Set
HO Drum Loader
1946 Hudson Set on Floor

These transparencies from the Ray Mohrlang Collection constitute some of the few color photographs of American Flyer displays.  These photos were apparently intended to be used in catalogs and other advertising media.  Ironically few of these actually made it to the advertising in color. 

With one exception, they were taken from 1959-1962.  This was after the Hall of Science in New York closed in 1958.   At this time, Gilbert maintained its sales office at 200 5th Ave., where most toy manufacturers of that era had their offices.  Gilbert did have a major display in those offices, which can be seen at the following link.  It is possible that some of these photos were taken on parts of that layout, but the photo of that layout is not detailed enough to confirm that.  It is also possible that these photos were taken on dioramas constructed especially for  photography purposes.  My best guess is that it is a combination of those two possibilities.

The photos shown here were probably seconds which were discarded in favor of better shots.   You can see that the advertising photos used differ slightly in several cases.  Unfortunately, these photos had deteriorated with age, but thanks to the Photoshop skills of Daryl Olszeski, they have been restored to approximate their original condition.  I have tried where possible to match them up with the advertising in which they were used.

Learn more about the Ray Mohrlang Collection